4.10.2009

Good Friday's Metaphor?

The range of topics covered in the Pope's Good Friday Meditations are too broad, and his analyses too intricate to reflect upon appropriately in a blog post (here is the Daily Mail's take). But the common theme is a warning: The rise of secularism in Western societies threatens to trivialize what humanity should be considering sacred.
"Everything in public life risks being desacralised–-persons, places, pledges, prayers, practices, words, sacred writings, religious formulae, symbols, ceremonies. Our life together is being increasingly secularised...Religious life grows diffident. Thus we see the most momentous matters placed among trifles, and trivialities glorified."

What strikes me is the juxtaposition of this statement with Daniel Dennett's question and point below. Talk about a disconnect.

2 comments:

Vitas said...

Dennet would agree with Benedict on this though: "Thus we see the most momentous matters placed among trifles, and trivialities glorified." And isn't Dennet preaching a sort of worship in his own context anyway?

Thomas said...

I think the Pope's warning against a perceived increase of secularization is in stark contrast to the undeniable globalization of just not markets and economies, but also culture and values. Consequently the cohabitation of diverse spiritualities in the West is interpreted by many Christian leaders as secularization, not tolerance.